Netflix US: Must watch top 3 movies on Netflix US

Netflix US: Must watch top 3 movies on Netflix US

Synopsis

Netflix US: The best Netflix movies can be difficult to come by, but we're not likely to run out of fantastic movies anytime soon. Whether you're looking for the finest action movies, best horror movies, best comedy, or best classic movies on Netflix, there's plenty to choose from.

Netflix US: Must watch top 3 movies on Netflix US
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Netflix US: The best Netflix movies can be difficult to come by, but we’re not likely to run out of fantastic movies anytime soon. Whether you’re looking for the finest action movies, best horror movies, best comedy, or best classic movies on Netflix, there’s plenty to choose from.

Bol News has revised the list for 2022 to reflect the loss of outstanding movies while showcasing underappreciated gems.

Rather than wasting time searching through categories in search of the right movie to watch, we’ve made it easy for you at Paste by regularly updating the Best Movies to Watch on Netflix list with new entries and neglected movies.

Here Bol News lists the must watch top 3 movies on Netflix US

Lady Bird

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Lady Bird

Year: 2017

Director: Greta Gerwig

Stars: Saoirse Ronan, Laurie Metcalf, Tracy Letts, Lucas Hedges, Beanie Feldstein, Timothee Chalamet

Genre: Drama, Comedy

Rating: R

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Christine “Lady Bird” McPherson (Saoirse Ronan) watches a young man belt out the final notes to “Being Alive” from Stephen Sondheim’s Company before auditioning for the school musical. “I wish I could just live through something,” she says wistfully as she lays her head on the window in a car with her mother a few seconds before. Lady Bird—and the film that bears her name, written and directed by Greta Gerwig—has ambivalence coursing through her veins, stuck in Sacramento, where she thinks there’s nothing to give her while paying close attention to what her home does have to offer. Stephen Sondheim and Greta Gerwig are a natural fit. Few filmmakers are able to capture the ambiguity and mixed feelings that come with refusing to make up one’s mind: consider 35-year-old Bobby in Company, who impulsively wants to marry a friend but never commits to any of his girlfriends; Cinderella’s “hemming and hawing” on the, ahem, steps of the palace; or Mrs. Lovett’s hesitation in telling Sweeney her true motives. Lady Bird isn’t as high-concept as many of Sondheim’s works, but it has a searing honesty to it, and to Gerwig’s work in general, that makes the film’s concerns and compassion resound with equal frequency in the viewer’s heart.

Monty Python and the Holy Grail

Monty Python and the Holy Grail

Year: 1975

Directors: Terry Gilliam, Terry Jones

Stars: Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Eric Idle, Terry Jones, Connie Booth

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Genre: Comedy

Rating: PG

It’s a shame that the Holy Grail’s lustre has been tarnished by its own ubiquity. When we hear terms like “flesh wound,” a “ni!” or “huge tracts of land,” our first thought is usually of having entire scenes read to us by dumb, obsessive nerds. Or, in my case, as a dumb, obsessive nerd, reciting entire episodes to strangers. However, if you try to separate yourself from the overabundance of jokes and revisit the film after a few years, you’ll find new jokes that feel as fresh and hysterical as the old ones. Holy Grail is, without a doubt, Python’s most densely packed comedy. There are a lot of humour in this movie, and given its notoriety, it’s remarkable how quickly we forget that. If you’re truly and irreparably burned out on this film, watch it again with commentary to uncover the second level of appreciation that comes from its creativity. It doesn’t appear to be a $400,000 film, and it’s fun to figure out which gags (like the coconut halves) were generated out of a necessity for low-budget solutions. Terry Jones (who only infrequently directed after Python broke up) and lone American Terry Gilliam (who prolifically warped Python’s cinematic approach into his own unique brand of nightmare fantasy) co-direct for the first time, and it moves with a strange precision.

The Irishman

The Irishman

Year: 2019

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Director: Martin Scorsese

Stars: Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, Joe Pesci, Jesse Plemons, Anna Paquin

Genre: Crime, Drama

Rating: R

Peggy Sheeran (Lucy Gallina) watches her father, Frank (Robert De Niro), pack his suitcase for a business trip via an open door. Trousers and shirts are tucked and folded neatly against the interior of the luggage. The brutal tool of Frank’s trade, the snubnose revolver, is loaded. He has no idea his daughter’s gaze is fixed on him; she’s born silent and has remained so for the majority of their adult interactions. He closes the file. She vanishes behind the closed door. Her verdict remains. The scene plays out about a third of the way through Martin Scorsese’s new film, The Irishman, which is named after Frank’s gangster moniker, and then replays in the final shot as Frank sits in his nursing home bed, old, decrepit, and utterly, hopelessly alone, abandoned by his family and bereft of his gangster friends through the passage of time. Perhaps he’s waiting for Death, but more likely he’s waiting for Peggy (played by Anna Paquin as an adult), who has disowned him and has no intention of forgiving him for his transgressions. Peggy acts as a moral compass for Scorsese. She’s a tough judge: The film is critical of machismo as it is manifested in the mafia and mugs. When Scorsese’s main protagonists aren’t planning or paying off plots with acts of violence, they’re having temper tantrums, eating ice cream, or, in one particularly sad scenario, slapping each other. This sequence is reminiscent of such miserable situations in Akira Kurosawa’s Drunken Angel and Rashomon: brawls between want tobe roughs who are scared of brawling but are compelled to by their own confidence. The Irishman covers the years Frank worked for the Bufalino crime family, led by Russell, from the 1950s until the early 2000s (Joe Pesci, out of retirement and intimidating). When the situation calls for it, “working” entails murdering some people, muscling others, and even blowing up a car or a structure. When he’s not committing gangland terrorism, he’s at home reading the newspaper, watching the news, and taking Peggy to the local grocer to beat him up for shoving her. Before Frank leads him out to the street and smashes his palm on the sidewalk, the poor doomed bastard says, “I only did what you should.” The Irishman is a work of historical nonfiction that follows Sheeran’s life, as well as the lives of the Bufalinos and their associates, especially those who died before their time (that being most of them). It’s also a portrayal of childhood under the shadow of cold-blooded brutality, and what a small girl must do to survive in a society characterised by violence.

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