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Baby sticky tape skin testing can identify eczema risk

Baby sticky tape skin testing can identify eczema risk

Baby sticky tape skin testing can identify eczema risk

Baby sticky tape skin testing

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  • According to scientists, a sticky tape skin test could determine whether or not newborn babies are likely to experience severe eczema.
  • The University of Copenhagen team utilized it to painlessly harvest and then evaluate skin cell samples from a group of two-month-old babies.
  • A total of 450 infants’ sticky tape samples were collected by the researchers.
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According to scientists, a sticky tape skin test could determine whether or not newborn babies are likely to experience severe eczema.

The University of Copenhagen team utilized it to painlessly harvest and then evaluate skin cell samples from a group of two-month-old babies.

In the cells associated with increased risk for developing eczema, they discovered identifiable immunological biomarker changes.

They advise early skin cream treatment for babies who are at high risk in order to prevent uncomfortable flare-ups.

The children in the study were shown to have a greater than the twofold increased risk of developing atopic eczema by the age of two compared to other infants who did not have elevated levels of Thymus and Activation-Regulated Chemokine in their skin cells.

A total of 450 infants’ sticky tape samples were collected by the researchers.

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The Lundbeck Foundation provided funding for their research, which is being presented at the 31st European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology Congress.

“To our knowledge, this is the first to show that non-invasively collected skin biomarkers can be used to predict the subsequent onset and severity of pediatric atopic eczema,” said Dr. Anne-Sofie Halling, one of the study’s lead investigators from the Bispebjerg Hospital at the University of Copenhagen.

According to her, the first few months seem to be an “open window of opportunity” for successful intervention that could lower the likelihood of developing atopic eczema.

“It is also at this age we were able to identify both immune and lipid biomarkers that predicted the development of atopic eczema.

“Our findings of predictive immune and lipid biomarkers collected at two months of age will help identify children at highest risk of atopic eczema using a non-invasive and painless method, so future preventive strategies can target these children only and prevent cases of this common disease that so many children are suffering from.”

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