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Coronavirus: Millions in China working from home


Atta Ur Rehman KhanWeb Editor & Columnist

06th Feb, 2020. 12:52 am
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coronavirus

China is facing the coronavirus and the life is totally disturbed but now this country has found the solution and many Chinese are working from home now.

According to the details, Millions of people in the country began working from home this week as both companies and local governments aimed to contain the spread of the novel coronavirus that had infected over 24,000 people nationwide as of Wednesday morning, killing nearly 500 of them.

The first day of these trials did not get off to the smoothest start. On Monday morning, video conference call providers such as Tencent’s WeChat Work, Alibaba-owned DingTalk, and U.S. firm Zoom were overwhelmed by surges in traffic, with many users complaining of lag and interruptions.

The sources of the sixth tone, DingTalk, which serves over 10 million companies in China and supports video calls with up to 302 people, announced Monday evening that it had experienced an all-time high in web traffic that morning, and had allocated 12,000 additional servers to increase its capacity. The same day, Zoom’s share price shot up 15%, the company’s biggest increase in eight months. On Tuesday, DingTalk said it had hastily added a beautifying camera filter to its video conference call app in response to sudden demand from users.

Managers have come up with some innovative solutions to ensure that their employees are being productive. One worker told the online outlet Tencent Technology that their company enforced its regular 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. work schedule by requiring employees to send their geotagged location and photos of themselves in front of their computers three times a day, plus daily health updates.

But creative work solutions have also led to some serious mistakes. On Monday, an employee at internet company Sougou accidentally sent a message to the app’s users warning that a city in the northern Hebei province was about to be hit by a 12.0 magnitude earthquake — the strongest ever recorded, had it not been completely fabricated. Sougou later apologized, removed its opt-in earthquake alert function, and attributed the error to an employee working remotely.

Coronavirus – All You Need To Know

Earlier on February 3, Managers have come up with some innovative solutions to ensure that their employees are being productive. One worker told the online outlet Tencent Technology that their company enforced its regular 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. work schedule by requiring employees to send their geotagged location and photos of themselves in front of their computers three times a day, plus daily health updates.

But creative work solutions have also led to some serious mistakes. On Monday, an employee at internet company Sougou accidentally sent a message to the app’s users warning that a city in the northern Hebei province was about to be hit by a 12.0 magnitude earthquake — the strongest ever recorded, had it not been completely fabricated. Sougou later apologized, removed its opt-in earthquake alert function, and attributed the error to an employee working remotely.

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