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New Sanctions On Hong Kong, China Threatens US To Retaliate


Aizbah KhanWeb Editor

16th Oct, 2020. 12:23 am
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New Sanctions On Hong Kong, China Threatens US To Retaliate

China says new US sanctions on Hong Kong’s security officials are an attempt to undermine the city’s stability.

China has also threatened the United States with indefinite retaliation.

According to the foreign news agency AP, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian said that China, the United States. Hong Kong strongly opposes and strongly condemns the Autonomy Act, under which the Foreign Secretary will report to Congress on those who seek to disrupt civil rights in the region.

This year’s report included 10 officials from China’s central government and Hong Kong, including Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam and Police Commissioner Chris Tang.

Zhao Lijian said the report was a total interference in China’s internal affairs and showed Washington’s nefarious intentions to undermine Hong Kong’s prosperity and stability and China’s development.

He said that if the United States continues on this path, China will take strong retaliatory measures to protect its national sovereignty and security interests, the legal rights and interests of Chinese companies and officials.

Sanctions on these officials include visa restrictions and possible restrictions on their transactions with US financial institutions. The officials were also banned under an executive order in August after China enacted a national security law in Hong Kong.

State Department spokesman Morgan Ortagus said in a statement announcing the sanctions that the Communist Party of China had severely damaged Hong Kong’s democratic institutions, human rights, judicial freedom and personal liberty by enforcing national security laws.

He cited arrests of peaceful protesters, the deployment of Chinese security agents in the region and political delays in local assembly elections in September as “contrary to the promises made by Hong Kong to Beijing in 1997.

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