Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Taliban fire rounds to put an end to an Afghan women’s demonstration in Kabul

Taliban fire rounds to put an end to an Afghan women’s demonstration in Kabul

Taliban fire rounds to put an end to an Afghan women’s demonstration in Kabul

Taliban fire

Advertisement
  •  During the Islamist group’s occupation of Afghanistan, hundreds of women were demanding the right to education, employment, and political engagement when security forces in Kabul opened fire and beat them.
  • Numerous women at the event were seen without face veils, according to eyewitness testimonies and social media posts.
  • Security personnel chased and battered some of the female protestors with their rifle butts, according to witnesses, after they sought safety in adjacent stores.
Advertisement

On the eve of the first anniversary of the Islamist group’s occupation of Afghanistan, hundreds of women were demanding the right to education, employment, and political engagement when security forces in Kabul opened fire and beat them.

Before Taliban soldiers violently put an end to the unusual anti-government demonstration, rally attendees in the Afghan capital marched toward the Education Ministry while chanting, “We want job, bread, and freedom.”

A banner that said “August 15 is a black day” was carried by demonstrators as they chanted “Justice, justice” and demanded the right to employment and political involvement.

Numerous women at the event were seen without face veils, according to eyewitness testimonies and social media posts.

Security personnel chased and battered some of the female protestors with their rifle butts, according to witnesses, after they sought safety in adjacent stores.

Videos of the demonstration posted on social media featured heavy shooting and Taliban militants abusing female protestors. Additionally, they forcibly stopped Afghan media from covering the rally.

Advertisement

Amnesty International voiced worry over the Taliban’s alleged use of “excessive force” to scatter peacefully demonstrating women on Twitter.

Taliban representatives did not respond to the accusations right away.

As U.S.-led and NATO allies withdrew their troops from Afghanistan last August 15 following nearly 20 years of conflict with the Taliban, the Taliban took over the country from the internationally recognized Afghan government.

In violation of the Taliban’s pledges to uphold the rights of all Afghans, the all-male interim government set up by the hardline organization in Kabul has since substantially reduced women’s rights to work and education and prevented the majority of teenage females from returning to secondary school.

Except for those who work for the ministries of education, health, and a select few others, women employed in the public sector have been instructed to stay at home and hide their faces in public.

They also forbid women from taking long journeys alone and demand that they cover completely in public, including their faces.

Advertisement

The restrictions infuriated female activists, who at first organized small protests against them. However, the Taliban employed violence and imprisoned the leaders, effectively putting a stop to such demonstrations for months.

The Taliban defend their actions by claiming that they adhere to Islamic law and Afghan culture, or Shariah.

Also Read

Kenyan presidential elections: Raila Odinga and William Ruto are in a close contest
Kenyan presidential elections: Raila Odinga and William Ruto are in a close contest

The two leading contenders in Kenya's presidential election are neck and neck...

Advertisement
Advertisement
Read More News On

Catch all the International News, Breaking News Event and Latest News Updates on The BOL News


Download The BOL News App to get the Daily News Update & Follow us on Google News.


End of Article
Advertisement
In The Spotlight Popular from Pakistan Entertainment
Advertisement

Next Story