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Shocking details about OceanGate CEO Stockton Rush

Shocking details about OceanGate CEO Stockton Rush

Shocking details about OceanGate CEO Stockton Rush

Shocking details about OceanGate CEO Stockton Rush

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Revelations made by Discovery Channel cameraman Brian Weed about OceanGate CEO Stockton Rush have shed light on concerning aspects of the ill-fated Titan test dive.

Weed, who was working on the TV show ‘Expedition Unknown’ for Discovery Channel in May 2021, had the opportunity to board the Titan sub before the expedition was ultimately cancelled. In a foreign media interview, he disclosed a “very strange” conversation he had with Rush.

According to Weed, Rush shared with him what would happen if they were to get lost while inside the submersible that eventually imploded last month with five individuals on board. Rush allegedly stated, “Well, there’s four or five days of oxygen on board, and I said, ‘What if they don’t find you?’ And he said, ‘Well, you’re dead anyway.'”

Weed found Rush’s response to be unsettling, with what he perceived as a nihilistic attitude towards life and death in the middle of the ocean.

The cameraman also expressed his discomfort with Rush’s “cavalier” approach to basic safety, which he said had made him uneasy from the start of the test dive. Weed described the dive as “plagued” with mechanical and communications issues and ultimately aborted.

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As a result of intense scrutiny and controversy over safety measures, OceanGate has announced the indefinite halt of all activities. The Titan sub went missing on June 18, and the subsequent discovery of its catastrophic implosion by the US Coast Guard on June 22 brought an end to the widely followed rescue operation.

OceanGate’s website confirmed the suspension of all exploration and commercial operations two weeks after the tragedy, which claimed the life of CEO Stockton Rush. Other individuals on board included British explorer Hamish Harding, French submarine expert Paul-Henri Nargeolet, and Pakistani-British tycoon Shahzada Dawood and his son Suleman.

Presumed human remains from the sub wreckage were recently recovered by experts and taken to the port of St John’s, Newfoundland. The victims are believed to have died instantly when the Titan imploded under immense pressure at a depth of over two miles in the North Atlantic.

Located 400 miles off the coast of Newfoundland, a debris field from the Titanic, the iconic ship that sank in 1912, was found 1,600 feet from its bow.

OceanGate Expeditions charged $250,000 per seat on its sub, but concerns about safety policies were raised following the implosion.

Investigations into the cause of the tragedy have been launched by the US Coast Guard and Canadian authorities. The sinking of the Titanic, resulting in the loss of more than 1,500 lives, has since become a subject of fascination for experts and tourists exploring the depths of the ocean.

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Titan sub operator declares that all activities will cease
Titan sub operator declares that all activities will cease

OceanGate, the company responsible for operating the Titan submersible that imploded during...

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