Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
France goes to the polls to choose a new president

France goes to the polls to choose a new president

France goes to the polls to choose a new president
Advertisement

After months of demagoguery and an absence of policy, France’s presidential election is now open.

While running for a second term, incumbent Emmanuel Macron appeared to be on his way to victory, thanks to his “statesman” stance in the Russia-Ukraine conflict. His victory would make him the first French president in 20 years to achieve so, following Jacques Chirac.
But Marine Le Pen, the far-right candidate who has been widely praised for her impressive campaign and transformation into a’moderate’ politician, has gained on Macron in the last few days.

In stark contrast to Macron, Le Pen has mostly focused on domestic problems, particularly on purchasing power, which voters stated was their most pressing concern in this election.

As soon as the polls shut at 18:00 GMT, French television stations will begin airing forecasts of the final results.

Advertisement

Emmanuel Macron and Marine Le Pen are expected to face each other in the second round of voting on April 24, a repeat of the landslide Macron achieved in the 2017 elections.

A critical two-week period follows the first round of voting for Francoise Boucek, a visiting research fellow and associate at the Centre for European Research.

A few hours after the first round, “it’s fascinating to observe the repositioning that is required,” she said. It is up to the other parties’ leaders to determine what to do and what to tell their constituents.

While all of the candidates are concerned about voters being “fed up with politicians,” far-left contender Jean-Luc Mélenchon, who is now polling third, is especially concerned.

If Le Pen and Macron face off, who will Mélenchon advise his supporters to vote for? All along, Macron has been the target of his wrath.

In light of the expected record-high level of abstention, Boucek believes that the intrigue surrounding the second round may encourage voters to turn out in greater numbers.

Advertisement

“Things have turned around quite a bit in the last several weeks, especially in the last few days,” she remarked. A sluggish start gave way to a thrilling conclusion.

A total of 48.7 million French citizens are registered to vote.

Anecdotal evidence points to a 28.4 percent turnout in France’s 2002 presidential election, which could be eclipsed by this year’s 22.2 percent turnout.

Also Read

Horrible car crash
Horrible car crash

After a T-bone collision between two automobiles propelled one into a gathering...

Advertisement
Advertisement
Read More News On

Catch all the International News, Breaking News Event and Latest News Updates on The BOL News


Download The BOL News App to get the Daily News Update & Follow us on Google News.


End of Article

Next Story