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ODI cricket faces identity dilemma in 2023 ICC World Cup year

ODI cricket faces identity dilemma in 2023 ICC World Cup year

ODI cricket faces identity dilemma in 2023 ICC World Cup year

ODI cricket faces an identity dilemma in ICC World Cup year

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  • The One-Day International (ODI) game is in an identity crisis.
  • Hectic cricketing schedule is putting players at risk of burnout and exhaustion.
  • 2023 ODI World Cup may give 50-over cricket a lifeline.
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Since its inception in 1971, the One-Day International (ODI) game has been viewed as a more result-driven variation of cricket, creating a sense of urgency as opposed to the longer format.

Aside from the addition of the third umpire (or TV empire), other changes included the batters’ shots becoming more aggressive, the arrival of coloured jerseys, day-night games, and floodlights, the development of more imaginative bowling, and the introduction of magical aspects in the fielding.

ODIs are currently experiencing an identity crisis after long serving as the pinnacle of cricket. Cricket players and spectators are at risk of stress and exhaustion due to a tight schedule that includes series that were played in only the tiniest breaks during the first year of the Covid-19 outbreak.

The ODI World Cup Super League was launched by the International Cricket Council (ICC), with ten points available in each match and teams needing wins to advance to the event in 2023 based on those points.

However, even if the 2027 and 2031 editions include 14 teams, compared to the 10 in the 2023 edition, the concept, which was intended to lend relevance and purpose to the format, will end when the ODI World Cup is staged in India.

Nobody knows what the future of ODIs holds with T20 gaining centre stage, albeit in franchise leagues, and three-format stars on the decline at the international level.

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If the India-hosted ODI World Cup in 2023 goes well and produces matches with the same level of excitement as T20s, it might give the 50-over format the much-needed breath of fresh air.

In one-day matches, a team still has a chance to rebound from a slow start and change the course of the match. As of late, runs have become easier to score in ODI cricket than to stop, the bowling side will deploy a variety of methods to keep the batting side under check.

Although there are restrictions on bowlers and fielders in the first ten overs and beyond as well, some underestimated but perfectly possible strategies include an extended outstanding spell of bowling, spectacular pieces of fielding, and cunning rushing between the wickets.

The 50-over contests can transform into an exhilarating and remarkably condensed version of Test cricket and extended style of T20s if they are played really well and avoid falling into the one-sided yawning trap.

Just take a look at what England has accomplished. Eoin Morgan hatched a plan to change the team’s approach to playing white-ball cricket following years of underperformance in ODIs, particularly after an early departure from the 2015 ODI World Cup.

The 2019 ODI World Cup was won by England under Morgan at Lord’s in an exciting Super Over by the narrowest of margins. In ODIs, which is exactly what a perfect T20 squad desires, the hitters who can attack right away, the pacers who can be taking wickets with the new ball, and the spinners who can control and pick wickets in the middle overs are of utmost importance.

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How can one then be sure that the 2023 ODI World Cup will reignite interest in ODI cricket? Have dynamic fields for competitive games during the league stage and the playoffs. 50-over matches are increasingly being played on placid surfaces.

Even while they generate excellent games, it lessens the suspense and makes the ODIs utterly predictable. In ODIs, there is a delicate balance between scoring quickly and scoring as many runs as you can, depending on the circumstance and, more significantly, the game’s circumstances.

The onus is on the ICC and hosts India to produce an even balance between bat and ball so that the Men’s ODI World Cup 2023 turns out to be a resounding success and gives the 50-over format a new lease on life and freedom from its current uncertainty. Many still view the ODI World Cup as the ultimate global trophy in the cricketing world.

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