Shark attacks swimmer off According to scientists, California survived an onslaught by the “world’s biggest ever” great white

Shark attacks swimmer off According to scientists, California survived an onslaught by the “world’s biggest ever” great white

Shark attacks swimmer off According to scientists, California survived an onslaught by the “world’s biggest ever” great white
Advertisement

Scientists claim that the GREAT white shark that mauled a swimmer at a Californian beach is one of the largest in the world.

After the ocean giant bit Steve Bruemmer, 62, in three places—his stomach, thigh, and arm—he lost 30 quarts of blood.

bleeding swimmer

Beachgoers help a bleeding swimmer after he was savaged by a 20ft shark in California

Blood spurted from Steve’s wounds as he was carried 100 yards to shore by a surf instructor and two paddleboarders.

Amazingly, despite the horrific mauling that occurred at Lover’s Point Beach in Monterey, he is predicted to heal well.

Advertisement

Based on a forensic analysis of Steve’s bite marks, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife determined the shark to be a great white.

It could be up to 20 feet long, which is around the length that great white sharks can reach at maturity.

Unaware beachgoers are stalked by a large bull shark just yards from shore, which is tense.
SHARK FEAR Unaware beachgoers are stalked by a large bull shark just yards from shore, which is tense.
That would put it on par with Deep Blue, the 2.5-ton, over-50-year-old great white that holds the record for the largest great white ever seen.

Huge female Deep Blue has been spotted roaming Guadalupe Island, which is located 550 miles to the south in Mexico.

Advertisement

The female monster discovered off the shore of Nova Scotia in 2020 weighed two tonnes and stood 17 feet tall. The Monterey monster is probably larger.

Although the rate of development slows as they age, great white sharks can live for up to 60 years without ever stopping growing.

When Steve was attacked on June 22 while swimming, witnesses saw the water become red with blood.

Visiting Kansas youngsters gasped in terror as he was pulled out of the sea by heroic bystanders.

When Steve cried for help, two paddleboarders—police officer Paul Bandy and his nursing wife Aimee Johns—were the first to respond.

Heath Braddock, a surf instructor who had been leading a group of children on an ocean outing, soon joined them.

Advertisement

The coach had to bring the class to safety on shore because the kids were “chest-deep” in the sea before saving Steve.

Isaiah said: “That much is certain: they experienced total immersion. They witnessed everything.”

He stated: “He was 300 feet away. Many tourists exclaim “shark!” and “cry wolf.” Rarely is this the case. Typically, it’s a dolphin.

“But the man persisted in his wild screaming. I could see the bloody puddle around him, so I knew it was genuine.”

He was dragged onto the larger of Heath’s two surfboards by Paul and Amy.

The seasoned surfer went on: “I tugged on his healthy arm, and they raised the other, bit arm.

Advertisement

The most obvious cut on his leg was where the bone was entirely exposed. His stomach’s front side sustained the majority of the injury.”

Then, as Steve hung on for dear life, Heath paddled “as hard as I could” to get back to the beach.

 

Advertisement
Advertisement
Read More News On

Catch all the Trending News, Breaking News Event and Latest News Updates on The BOL News


Download The BOL News App to get the Daily News Update & Follow us on Google News.


End of Article

Next Story