France’s Macron invites political parties to discuss hung parliament-source

France’s Macron invites political parties to discuss hung parliament-source

France’s Macron invites political parties to discuss hung parliament-source

France’s Macron invites political parties to discuss hung parliament-source (credits:google)

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  • Macron’s centrist alliance is under pressure to obtain support from rivals.
  • If it fails, France could be left in a state of political stalemate for a long time.
  • Coalition formation has not been characteristic of postwar politics in France.
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PARIS – After his party lost its absolute majority in the new parliament, French President Emmanuel Macron will call all political groups capable of forming a group for discussions on Tuesday and Wednesday, according to a source close to Macron.

After weekend elections resulted in a hung parliament, Macron’s centrist alliance is under pressure to obtain support from rivals in order to save Macron’s reform agenda. If it fails, France could be left in a state of political stalemate for a long time.

A COALITION AGREEMENT
Prior to 1958, this was the rule in the Third and Fourth Republics, but coalitions were so unstable that governments lasted only a few months at most.

This instability, which some argue contributed to France’s early defeat by Nazi Germany in 1939 by leaving the country unprepared, is why postwar leader Charles de Gaulle drafted a new constitution for the Fifth Republic with broad presidential powers and a two-round voting system designed to give the president a strong majority.

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As a result, unlike other nations such as the Netherlands or Germany, coalition formation has not been a characteristic of postwar politics in France, leaving the political elite with little experience or tradition in reaching consensus.

Macron may yet try to reach out to the conservative Les Republicains party, which is the only mainstream party with enough votes to get him over the 289-vote threshold needed for an absolute majority.

According to Reuters, Macron privately reached out to the Senate’s president, LR veteran Gerard Larcher, last week, indicating that he was laying the groundwork for such a situation.

Senior LR leaders, on the other hand, were quick to dismiss a formal coalition on Sunday.

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