Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Kuwait dissolves parliament, postpone budget approval until after elections

Kuwait dissolves parliament, postpone budget approval until after elections

Kuwait dissolves parliament, postpone budget approval until after elections

Kuwait dissolves parliament, postpone budget approval

Advertisement
  • Kuwait’s parliament dissolved in a decree issued on Tuesday, according to state news agency.
  • Crown Prince Sheikh Meshal al-Ahmad al-Sabah moved to end impasse between government and parliament.
  • Previous administration resigned in April in response to non-cooperation motion in parliament. Parliament was dissolved for the last time in 2016.
Advertisement

Kuwait’s parliament was formally dissolved in a decree issued on Tuesday, according to state news agency, as the Gulf Arab state’s crown prince moved to end an impasse between the government and elected parliament that had hampered fiscal reform.

Crown Prince Sheikh Meshal al-Ahmad al-Sabah, who has assumed most of the functions of the reigning emir, announced last month that he will dissolve parliament and call for early elections. He approved a cabinet led by a new prime minister on Monday.

“To rectify the political scene, the lack of harmony and cooperation … and behaviour that undermines national unity, it was necessary to resort to the people…to rectify the path,” Sheikh Meshal said in the decree dissolving parliament.

The state budget had not yet been approved by Parliament. Finance Minister Abdul Wahab al-Rasheed stated on Tuesday that the budget for fiscal year 2022/2023 will be authorised after the elections, which have yet to be scheduled, and that the government would continue to operate under the budget for fiscal year 2021/2022.

Advertisement

In a statement, Al-Rasheed said the next budget, which had to be approved by November, had set spending at 23.65 billion dinars ($77.24 billion), up from 23.48 billion in the 2021/2022 budget.

The previous administration resigned in April in response to a non-cooperation motion in parliament against Prime Minister Sheikh Sabah al-Khalid, who was succeeded as premier late last month by the current emir’s son, Sheikh Ahmad Nawaf al-Sabah.

Advertisement

Political stability in Kuwait, an OPEC oil producer, has long relied on cooperation between the administration and parliament, the most active legislature in the Gulf area.

Although political parties are prohibited in Kuwait, the legislature has more power than equivalent entities in other Gulf monarchies.

Stalemates between Kuwait’s administration and parliament have frequently resulted in cabinet reshuffles and legislative dissolutions throughout the years, impeding investment and reforms. Parliament was dissolved for the last time in 2016.

Also Read

Biden fist-bumps Saudi Crown Prince before crucial meeting
Biden fist-bumps Saudi Crown Prince before crucial meeting

President Biden's fist bump with Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman...

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Read More News On

Catch all the World News, Breaking News Event and Latest News Updates on The BOL News


Download The BOL News App to get the Daily News Update & Follow us on Google News.


End of Article

Next Story