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Chinese biologists cloned an Arctic wolf

Chinese biologists cloned an Arctic wolf

Chinese biologists cloned an Arctic wolf

Chinese biologists cloned an Arctic wolf

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  • A wild Arctic wolf was cloned by researchers in China.
  • They now hope to employ the contentious genetic technology.
  • The globe inches closer to an extinction crisis.
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A wild Arctic wolf was cloned by researchers in China, and they now hope to employ the contentious genetic technology to help save other threatened species as the globe inches closer to an extinction crisis.

The female wolf clone, known as Maya by scientists, was introduced by the Beijing-based company Sinogene Biotechnology on Monday, 100 days after her June 10 birth.

The firm reported that Maya, a grey-brown puppy with a bushy tail, is in good health. It played videos of Maya relaxing and having fun during a press conference.

“After two years of arduous work, the arctic wolf was successfully cloned. According to Chinese official media, Mi Jidong, the company’s general manager, stated during the news conference that it was the first instance of its sort in the entire world.

The High Arctic tundra in Canada’s northern Arctic Archipelago is home to a subspecies of grey wolf known as the Arctic wolf, commonly referred to as the white wolf or polar wolf. Since its Arctic habitat is sufficiently remote to elude hunters, its conservation status, which is a criterion used to assess how near a species is to extinction, is regarded as low risk, according to the World Wildlife Fund.

But human construction like roads and pipelines is encroaching on its land, and climate change is posing an increasing threat to its food supply.

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In cooperation with the polar tourist park Harbin Polarland, Sinogene claimed in a statement issued on the social media site Weibo that it would begin its Arctic wolf cloning project in 2020.

The business employed a procedure known as somatic cell nuclear transfer to produce Maya; same method was also used in 1996 to produce Dolly the sheep, the first mammal clone ever.

First, they extracted “donor cells” from the skin of the original Arctic wolf, Maya, who was brought to Harbin Polarland from Canada. These cells were then injected into a female dog’s egg and delivered by a surrogate mother.

One healthy Arctic wolf, the recently cloned Maya, was born after the scientists were able to generate 85 of these embryos and implant them into the uteri of seven beagles, according to state media.

Another cloned arctic wolf is anticipated to give birth soon, the business stated in a Weibo post.

According to He Zhenming, director of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Resources of China’s National Institute for Food and Drug Control, “Cloning technology provides a good entry point for the protection of endangered wild animals, which is a great contribution to the protection of biodiversity.”

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According to the blog post, he also said that Maya’s successful cloning was a “landmark occurrence, which is of significant relevance to the world’s wildlife protection and the restoration of endangered species.”

The Beijing Wildlife Park and Sinogene will collaborate to perform research on additional cloning techniques and applications as well as on the preservation and breeding of rare and endangered species in China, according to Sinogene.

According to Global Times, the first Maya passed away in 2021 due to old age. The public Harbin Polarland will eventually host the cloned Maya, who is currently residing with her beagle surrogate mother.

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