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Russian draught protests continue with hundreds arrested

Russian draught protests continue with hundreds arrested

Russian draught protests continue with hundreds arrested

Russian Draught protests continue with hundreds arrested

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  • 724 people were arrested in 32 different Russian cities on Saturday, OVD-Info says.
  • Protests against Russia’s new “partial mobilization” continue across the country.
  • President Vladimir Putin wants to send 300,000 men to fight in Ukraine.
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An independent rights group said that hundreds of people have been arrested as protests against Russia’s new “partial mobilisation” continue across the country.

OVD-Info said that on Saturday, 724 people were arrested in 32 different cities.

Since President Vladimir Putin said he wants to send 300,000 men to fight in Ukraine, there have been many protests.

Russian law says that you can’t hold a rally without permission.

But Mr. Putin’s decision to force civilians into the military has led to large-scale protests in cities. Earlier this week, more than 1,000 people were arrested at protests.

As she was being arrested by police in Moscow, AFP said they heard a protester shout, “We are not cannon fodder!”

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And in Russia’s second largest city, St. Petersburg, a man told reporters, “I don’t want to go to war for Putin.”

Natalya Dubova, who is 70 years old, told AFP that she was against the war and that she was “scared” that young people would be sent to the front.

Some of the people who were arrested on Saturday said that while they were being held by security officials, they were given draught papers and told to go to recruiting centres. This week, the Kremlin defended the practise by saying, “It’s not against the law.”

Moscow has also approved harsher punishments for people accused of not doing what they were supposed to do after they were drafted.

Mr. Putin signed new orders on Saturday that give soldiers up to 10 years in prison if they surrender, try to leave the military, or refuse to fight.

The president also signed orders that give Russian citizenship to anyone from outside the country who joins the military for a year.

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Some people have said that the decree shows how bad Moscow’s lack of troops has become. It gets around the usual rule that you have to have lived in the country for five years.

Other young Russians continue to try to leave the country to avoid being called up.

At the border with Georgia, lines of Russian cars go back more than 30 km (18 miles), and the interior ministry has asked people not to go.

Local Russian officials have said that a lot of cars are trying to cross, and at one checkpoint, there are almost 2,500 cars waiting.

The admission is a change of tone for Russia. On Thursday, the Kremlin said that reports of Russians trying to avoid military service were “fake.”

At the same time, there has been a sharp rise in the number of Russians trying to get into Finland.

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Matti Pitkaniitty, a spokesman for the country’s Border Guard, said that the number of Russians arriving has more than doubled since last week.

The government said on Friday that it wants to stop Russian tourists from coming to the country.

President Sauli Niinisto told the state broadcaster that the goal is to cut the number of people coming to Finland from Russia by a lot.

Several other nearby countries have already said they won’t let Russians who want to avoid the draught stay there.

Edgars Rinkvis, the foreign minister of Latvia, said that many Russians who are now leaving their country because of mobilisation were fine with killing Ukrainians. “They didn’t complain back then. They are not conscientious objectors, so you shouldn’t think of them as such.”

On Friday, the Kremlin announced a list of jobs that won’t have to be filled by conscripts. This is meant to help Russia’s war effort in Ukraine.

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The “partial mobilisation” that President Putin announced on Wednesday will not affect IT workers, bankers, or journalists who work for state media.

But some people have questioned whether the Kremlin’s claims are true, and there are reports that local recruiting officers are calling up Russian men who don’t meet the requirements.

The editor of RT, a state-run news outlet, Margarita Simonyan, put a list of elderly and disabled people who were told to report for duty on Twitter.

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