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U.S. Navy seizes more than 2,000 AK-47s

U.S. Navy seizes more than 2,000 AK-47s

U.S. Navy seizes more than 2,000 AK-47s

A US Navy warship participates in a freedom of navigation exercise

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  • More than 2,000 assault riflest were likely headed for Yemeni rebels.
  • More than 50 tonnes of ammunition, fuses, and rocket propellant were taken by the US.
  • Boat posed a risk to commercial ship navigation and ordered its sinking says U.S. military experts.
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Vice Admiral: “This shipment is a continuation of Iran’s pattern of destabilising action.” “We are concerned about these risks.”
According to a statement from U.S. Central Command, the U.S. Navy confiscated more than 2,000 assault rifles from a fishing boat on Friday that were likely headed for Yemeni rebels who are supported by Iran.

The ship, which had six Yemenis working on board, was travelling through the Gulf of Oman on a route that is frequently used to transport illegal goods to the Houthi rebels when U.S. sailors stopped it and seized the 2,116 AK-47 firearms.
Vice Adm. Brad Cooper, the commander of the U.S. 5th Fleet, Combined Maritime Forces, and U.S. Naval Forces Central Command, stated that “this shipment is part of a sustained pattern of destabilising conduct from Iran. These threats have our attention. We remain vigilant in detecting any maritime activity that impedes freedom of navigation or compromises regional security.”

More than 50 tonnes of ammunition, fuses, and rocket propellant were taken by the US on December 1 from a fishing boat in the Gulf of Oman, which divides Iran from the southern Arabian Peninsula.

According to U.S. Central Command, the Navy and Coast Guard stopped a sizable Iranian shipment of explosives that was on route to Yemen one month earlier.

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In the Gulf of Oman on November 8, the Coast Guard ship USCGC John Scheuerman and the Navy guided missile destroyer USS The Sullivans came upon the stateless fishing boat, which was hauling more than 180 tonnes of urea fertiliser and ammonium perchlorate.

After examining the boat and removing the explosives and Yemeni crew members, U.S. military explosives experts determined that the boat posed a risk to commercial ship navigation and ordered its sinking.

The mostly Shiite Houthi rebels, who currently hold much of northern Yemen and are at war with Saudi Arabia, have long received help from Iran.

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